Posts Tagged: pencil-and-paper games

Crossword Light and Crux Crosswords

I am not a serious crossword puzzler. But I really like the ones that hit at the sweet spot of being challenging without being exasperating. And a bonus when they have interesting words that people might actually use (granted, provided they have large vocabularies). There are dozens of crossword apps out there, but many are for serious crossworders, or those who want to download puzzles from their favorite publications (like the NYT). Because I don’t need that, Crossword Light and Crux are great. Each comes with a healthy number of puzzles (a few dozen each), divided into different levels of difficulty. The easy ones are not too easy, and the hard ones are not too hard. Everything within my range. Each has an option to “check” or to “reveal” either a cell or a clue or the whole puzzle. If you “check” (which I do a few times a puzzle) then every wrong letter is marked with a red tick in the corner. I like that. I like Crossword Light’s puzzles a bit more, and Crux’s interface a bit more (e.g., it removes items from the clue list if you filled in the word). But I definitely recommend either one. Crossword Light is free, Crux Crosswords I picked up on sale for a buck. If you buy the paid version of Crossword Light, you can download puzzles from different publications.

Survival Score: Permanent place

Advertisements

Crossword Light and Crux Crosswords

I am not a serious crossword puzzler. But I really like the ones that hit at the sweet spot of being challenging without being exasperating. And a bonus when they have interesting words that people might actually use (granted, provided they have large vocabularies). There are dozens of crossword apps out there, but many are for serious crossworders, or those who want to download puzzles from their favorite publications (like the NYT). Because I don’t need that, Crossword Light and Crux are great. Each comes with a healthy number of puzzles (a few dozen each), divided into different levels of difficulty. The easy ones are not too easy, and the hard ones are not too hard. Everything within my range. Each has an option to “check” or to “reveal” either a cell or a clue or the whole puzzle. If you “check” (which I do a few times a puzzle) then every wrong letter is marked with a red tick in the corner. I like that. I like Crossword Light’s puzzles a bit more, and Crux’s interface a bit more (e.g., it removes items from the clue list if you filled in the word). But I definitely recommend either one. Crossword Light is free, Crux Crosswords I picked up on sale for a buck. If you buy the paid version of Crossword Light, you can download puzzles from different publications.

Survival Score: Permanent place

Topple!

From the name, you’d think this was a stacking game, right? It’s not. Definitely not the right name. In fact, there is another game on the store called Topple (no exclamation mark) that is all about stacking. So be sure to get the one with the !. This is is the iPad-ified version of those puzzles where you have to figure out a fairly long quote or a saying. You get the blanks where the letters go, and the blanks line up like columns. At the bottom of each column are the letters that go into the column, but mixed up, so you have to figure out which letter goes into which blank. What I like about these is that each puzzle isn’t necessarily all that hard, but the game comes with hundreds of quotes, and additional packs are a buck for about 50 puzzles. The game play is very smooth and the interface is simple and uncluttered. It has a left handed setting (a nice touch for lefties like me) and–like the best examples in the pencil-and-paper world–the quotes are sometimes witty or clever.

Survival Score: Permanent place

Topple!

From the name, you’d think this was a stacking game, right? It’s not. Definitely not the right name. In fact, there is another game on the store called Topple (no exclamation mark) that is all about stacking. So be sure to get the one with the !. This is is the iPad-ified version of those puzzles where you have to figure out a fairly long quote or a saying. You get the blanks where the letters go, and the blanks line up like columns. At the bottom of each column are the letters that go into the column, but mixed up, so you have to figure out which letter goes into which blank. What I like about these is that each puzzle isn’t necessarily all that hard, but the game comes with hundreds of quotes, and additional packs are a buck for about 50 puzzles. The game play is very smooth and the interface is simple and uncluttered. It has a left handed setting (a nice touch for lefties like me) and–like the best examples in the pencil-and-paper world–the quotes are sometimes witty or clever.

Survival Score: Permanent place

Towers Infinite

And thus begins a set of posts about pencil-and-paper games that have been iPad-ified. In Towers Infinite, you get a grid (4×4 for easy, and 6×6 for very hard). Along the edges of the grid are numbers. The numbers tell you how many towers are “visible” from that position if you look down the column or across the row. On the easier levels, some of the boxes will already be filled in. So, it’s completely a puzzle, specifically a logic puzzle. Love it. There are several of these on the store, what I like about this one is the many levels of difficulty, and how you can get a hint or check an answer. And, like on the better sudoku games, you have an option of entering multiple numbers in a box until you decide which one is correct.

Survival score: permanent place

Towers Infinite

And thus begins a set of posts about pencil-and-paper games that have been iPad-ified. In Towers Infinite, you get a grid (4×4 for easy, and 6×6 for very hard). Along the edges of the grid are numbers. The numbers tell you how many towers are “visible” from that position if you look down the column or across the row. On the easier levels, some of the boxes will already be filled in. So, it’s completely a puzzle, specifically a logic puzzle. Love it. There are several of these on the store, what I like about this one is the many levels of difficulty, and how you can get a hint or check an answer. And, like on the better sudoku games, you have an option of entering multiple numbers in a box until you decide which one is correct.

Survival score: permanent place

Word Triangle

When I was little, we would buy puzzle magazines–the ones from Penny Press, the big “Variety Packs”. And then I went to college, and I continued buying them. But not any more, since I can get so many of the pencil-and-paper puzzles as an iPad game. Word Triangle is one of those — 7 words, starting with 1 letter going up to 7, each word using the letters of the one before it +1. And a clue for each of the words. Great and simple classic puzzle. Word Triangle, though, just doesn’t have what it needs to pull it off. The interface is clunky (e.g., the keyboard is not QWERTY), the dictionary is just OK, and the clues –in the same puzzle — swing from way too easy to way not. I will keep looking.

Survival Score: Trudged through 7 puzzles. Then deleted.

Word Triangle

When I was little, we would buy puzzle magazines–the ones from Penny Press, the big “Variety Packs”. And then I went to college, and I continued buying them. But not any more, since I can get so many of the pencil-and-paper puzzles as an iPad game. Word Triangle is one of those — 7 words, starting with 1 letter going up to 7, each word using the letters of the one before it +1. And a clue for each of the words. Great and simple classic puzzle. Word Triangle, though, just doesn’t have what it needs to pull it off. The interface is clunky (e.g., the keyboard is not QWERTY), the dictionary is just OK, and the clues –in the same puzzle — swing from way too easy to way not. I will keep looking.

Survival Score: Trudged through 7 puzzles. Then deleted.