Posts Tagged: Arcade

Air Hockey by accelerato

Air hockey is one of those games that my husband will sometimes play with me when we come across a table and I whine and pout until he gives on. Ok, it’s not quite that bad, BUT. A true air hockey partner is hard to find. Accelerato managed to create an AI opponent that looks and acts like the real thing. The other controller doesn’t just sit there, it moves around, follows the puck the way a real player would, sometimes hits hard and sometimes soft, sometimes banks and sometimes hits straight ahead. Even taps the puck over the middle line like it can’t quite reach the middle of the table. It’s awesome! The pick moves realistically, with adequate inertia. There are multiple levels of difficulty. The controller follows your finger almost flawlessly.

Survival mode: permanent place so I can always get my fix.

Advertisements

Air Hockey by accelerato

Air hockey is one of those games that my husband will sometimes play with me when we come across a table and I whine and pout until he gives on. Ok, it’s not quite that bad, BUT. A true air hockey partner is hard to find. Accelerato managed to create an AI opponent that looks and acts like the real thing. The other controller doesn’t just sit there, it moves around, follows the puck the way a real player would, sometimes hits hard and sometimes soft, sometimes banks and sometimes hits straight ahead. Even taps the puck over the middle line like it can’t quite reach the middle of the table. It’s awesome! The pick moves realistically, with adequate inertia. There are multiple levels of difficulty. The controller follows your finger almost flawlessly.

Survival mode: permanent place so I can always get my fix.

Collision Effect

Collision Effect is a game I should delete from my iPad, but I can never bring myself to do it. Simple idea– colored balls appear on the screen. Touch one of them to make the other ones zoom to it, smashing together and disappearing. If different colors collide, though, that’s bad and you lose the game or use up a life or whatever.

There is a puzzle mode, where the balls are prearranged in different configurations. With the umpteen puzzle games I have, I’m just not that interested in this mode. Then there are two arcade modes, the only difference I can tell between them is that in one of them any mistake means game over. In the other, you can make limited mistakes.

These games usually stress me out, and I usually don’t even download them. But this one is SO DAMN PRETTY. The developers include nice touches, like a viscous environment, sparkles on collision, making each circle glow inside. Nice colors, responsive gameplay, simple controls. I just feel guilty thinking about deleting it! And the visual appeal is great enough that it gets me to click on the “replay” option once I crash and burn at a relatively low stage.

Survival score: 30 or so minutes each session, maybe once every couple of months, can’t bring myself to give it the boot.

Collision Effect

Collision Effect is a game I should delete from my iPad, but I can never bring myself to do it. Simple idea– colored balls appear on the screen. Touch one of them to make the other ones zoom to it, smashing together and disappearing. If different colors collide, though, that’s bad and you lose the game or use up a life or whatever.

There is a puzzle mode, where the balls are prearranged in different configurations. With the umpteen puzzle games I have, I’m just not that interested in this mode. Then there are two arcade modes, the only difference I can tell between them is that in one of them any mistake means game over. In the other, you can make limited mistakes.

These games usually stress me out, and I usually don’t even download them. But this one is SO DAMN PRETTY. The developers include nice touches, like a viscous environment, sparkles on collision, making each circle glow inside. Nice colors, responsive gameplay, simple controls. I just feel guilty thinking about deleting it! And the visual appeal is great enough that it gets me to click on the “replay” option once I crash and burn at a relatively low stage.

Survival score: 30 or so minutes each session, maybe once every couple of months, can’t bring myself to give it the boot.

DropZap (and DropZap 2)

Drop Zap and its sibling Drop Zap 2 are gems. A simple game — board set up resembling Tetris. Same challenge…each time something drops, the board raises one higher. Objective is to clear the board. Except instead fitting shapes together, the shapes are the same (circles, or cubes), but from small to large. I play with circles, so each time a circle drops, a beam goes vertically and horizontally. Every other shape in the path of the beam shrinks by one size. (Hence, the “zap” in Drop Zap.) If a circle was at its smallest size, it disappears, and the column drops to fill in the space. That triggers another set of beams, and if you get a good arrangement, you can build amazing cascades.

Drop Zap 2 adds reflectors to the mix. The reflectors come up from the bottom at random. They, too shrink when hit with a beam, but they will also redirect it. So it’s possible to get multiple beams going at once, shrinking many columns or rows all at the same time.

I love this game because of the strategy…you have to think a few moves ahead if you want to set up cascades (which get more points). But there’s risk involved, too, if you get too many huge circles. And watching the zaps is mesmerizing…something graceful, colorful, geometric. Love it.

I don’t play it constantly, like some other games such as Scramble, but it is always new and fresh when I pick it up after a long hiatus. Survival score: 30-60 minutes per session; permanent place on my iPad.

DropZap (and DropZap 2)

Drop Zap and its sibling Drop Zap 2 are gems. A simple game — board set up resembling Tetris. Same challenge…each time something drops, the board raises one higher. Objective is to clear the board. Except instead fitting shapes together, the shapes are the same (circles, or cubes), but from small to large. I play with circles, so each time a circle drops, a beam goes vertically and horizontally. Every other shape in the path of the beam shrinks by one size. (Hence, the “zap” in Drop Zap.) If a circle was at its smallest size, it disappears, and the column drops to fill in the space. That triggers another set of beams, and if you get a good arrangement, you can build amazing cascades.

Drop Zap 2 adds reflectors to the mix. The reflectors come up from the bottom at random. They, too shrink when hit with a beam, but they will also redirect it. So it’s possible to get multiple beams going at once, shrinking many columns or rows all at the same time.

I love this game because of the strategy…you have to think a few moves ahead if you want to set up cascades (which get more points). But there’s risk involved, too, if you get too many huge circles. And watching the zaps is mesmerizing…something graceful, colorful, geometric. Love it.

I don’t play it constantly, like some other games such as Scramble, but it is always new and fresh when I pick it up after a long hiatus. Survival score: 30-60 minutes per session; permanent place on my iPad.